Saturday, November 24, 2018

Space Pie

For those who celebrate Thanksgiving and are still recovering, I apologize for starting off with a culinary gag.

I'm feeling a bit logy myself, so this week's post is briefer than usual.

It's not easy working in a hot kitchen while wearing your raw selvedge skinny jeans.


Speed dating technology has finally advanced. 

The caption for this gag involves a form of wordplay I refer to as a streptonym. We're still waiting for the term to appear in a dictionary somewhere.


This tattooist is a wise craftsperson. Drawing somebody's kid is always risky, particularly when it's going to be a permanent addition to the client's body.


He also keeps his job description short.


It's not easy to get on Frankie's calendar. He's a very busy monster.

I close my eyes when the doctor says it, but I'm sure this is what I'd see.

Cruise on over to Bizarro.com to read Dan's blogging on this week's cartoons, and to admire his latest gorgeous Sunday page.

Bonus Track

Inspired by Saturday's comic, here's a song about a medical professional.




The original recording of the tune, released in 1960, was a hit record for David Seville, the stage name of Ross Bagdasarian, creator of The Chipmunks. 

The 45 of this wacky German version came in a gorgeous picture sleeve.

Scan courtesy of the Wayno Vinyl Archive

4 comments:

Andrea Denninger said...

That isn't FRANKIE; that's Frankenstein's monster, who has no name.

Wayno said...

"Frankie" is an affectionate shorthand name for "Frankenstein's Monster."

kent said...

Wayno, your German version of the Witch Doctor made my day. As a kid, I loved that song, David Seville and the chipmunks and one of my prized recordings is an LP of the Chipmunks singing Beatles tunes. (In English, not German.) And for making my day, Danke.

Wayno said...

Kent, I'm glad to hear someone checks out the bonus tracks. Ross Bagdasarian (David Seville) had an interesting and odd career, for sure.

Several years ago, I found a stash of German 45s at a record store, many of which were covers of English language rock & roll songs, and most are unintentionally hilarious.